Archive for November, 2012

Join the Arbonne Inside Out Wellness Workshop! Get drastic healthy results in 30 days!

November 28, 2012

Are you: in need of a safe & effective guided weight loss plan, wanting to end sugar and food cravings, in need of more energy, less stress, and a healthier digestive system?

GET Healthy from the Inside Out!

Join my online Inside Out Wellness Workshop- FREE!

Arbonne Essentials got my dangerous sugar and carb addiction under control and I lost 35 lbs and 4 dress sizes in 4 months!

Turn your life around in 30 Days
If you or someone you know:

just wants to feel and look better!
ü Suffers with hormone imbalances
ü Wants more information on eating gluten or dairy free
ü Has experienced a plateau or is just stuck at their weight
ü Is transitioning to better eating
ü Wants to know if vitamins really make a difference
ü Wants more energy to help with the upcoming holidays
ü Is interested in cleansing, but may be a little scared to get started.
ü Has acid reflux, IBS or other digestive issues

THREE Webinar options to learn more, click on the link on each date:

Wednesday, Nov 28, 2 pm ET, 1 pm CT, 11 am PT
http://www.mywebevent.com/SC378R5rRKH1pbAN6e0J

Thursday, Nov 29, 8 pm ET, 7 pm CT, 5 pm PT
http://www.mywebevent.com/SoPjsTwy33G7v77D0UG7

Friday, Nov 30, 2 pm ET, 1 pm CT, 11 am PT
http://www.mywebevent.com/So7x7KuKO53rhZAHFZU7

Questions? Email me @ aerobicsdelivered@gmail.com OR call 404-380-8360
http://www.lawandathefitnessdiva.myarbonne.com

“NO WHEY”! The dangers of whey protein and why vegan protein is the safest route!

November 17, 2012

 

Common Health Concerns With Many Protein Supplements  ( This is taken from a nutrition site)

New research suggests some potential health concerns over certain proteins such as aminoacidemia and allergies. Below is a brief explanation of the potential problems with whey, dairy, and soy protein supplements.

Dairy Protein Digestion Problems

–The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) estimates that 30 to 50 million Americans are lactose intolerant. These are people who cannot digest lactose, the sugar found in dairy products. According to the FDA, symptoms include gas, stomach cramps, diarrhea, etc. However, many others are also allergic to dairy products, specifically the proteins found in milk and whey. Either way, poorly digested bovine antigens (substances that provoke an immune reaction) like casein become “allergens” in allergic individuals. Dairy products are the leading cause of food allergy, often revealed by diarrhea, constipation and fatigue. Many cases of asthma and sinus infections are reported to be relieved and even eliminated by cutting out dairy. The exclusion of dairy, however, must be complete to see any benefit.
Lactose Intolerance

http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3429.htm
Protein Milk Allergies

http://www.allergyclinic.co.nz/guides/21.html
http://www.pcrm.org/pcrmSearch.cfm
Whey Protein Allergies

http://lib.bioinfo.pl/pmid:11729348
http://www.newsrx.com/article.php?articleID=1083537
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14657886
http://foodallergens.ifr.ac.uk
Health Problems With Whey & Dairy Allergies and intolerances

Protein digestion begins in the stomach. If the food you eat is not cooked or processed, enzymes present in the food itself will actually break down some 70% of the protein in the first hour in a process called autolytic digestion. After the first hour, pepsinogen and hydrochloric acid are introduced to the process (the hydrochloric acid converts the pepsinogen into pepsin). Pepsin further breaks down the protein into amino acids and their derivatives, a process that is completed (theoretically) by the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin produced in the pancreas and released into the small intestine. The amino acids and related molecules derived from the dietary protein are then absorbed through the walls of the gastrointestinal tract. The absorption rate of the individual amino acids is highly dependent on the protein source. For example, after whey protein is broken down, some 90% of it is absorbed quickly — perhaps too quickly — whereas soy protein is absorbed much more slowly and much less completely. A rice and pea protein combination, on the other hand splits the difference — sharing soy’s longer absorption time frame, but whey’s high level of ultimate absorption.

This process, however, is not equal in all people. How the food is cooked, whether or not the protein is denatured by processing and heat, the presence or absence of enzymes (natural or supplemented), and the presence of other substances such as pectin can all affect the ultimate break down of the proteins and whether or not they trigger allergies or are responsible for intolerances. Which brings us to the question at hand.

Technically speaking, food allergies and food intolerances are two different things. A food allergy, or hypersensitivity, is defined as an abnormal response to a food triggered by the immune system. Common symptoms, according to medical authorities, usually appear within minutes to a couple of hours after eating the food in question and include:

Tingling sensation in the mouth
Swelling of the tongue and throat
Difficulty breathing
Hives
Acne
Vomiting
Abdominal cramps
Diarrhea
Drop in blood pressure
Loss of consciousness, and death.
A food intolerance, on the other hand, does not involve the immune system (theoretically), occurs in the digestive tract, and is characterized by symptoms such as gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, headaches, and dark circles under the eyes.

In truth, food allergies and intolerances are two sides of the same coin (the inability to break down the food in question) manifesting in different parts of the body. If the protein in question is so large that it can’t pass through the walls of the intestine and the symptoms they cause manifest in the intestinal tract without involving the immune system, they are called an intolerance. On the other hand, if the protein breaks down enough to pass through the walls of the intestine and enter the bloodstream, but allows for relatively larger proteins (larger than its constituent amino acids) to enter the bloodstream and be targeted as antigens by the immune system (or affect mast cells in the intestinal wall), you have a food allergy. Two parts of the immune response are involved:

The antibody, immunoglobulin E (IgE), that circulates in the blood.
And mast cells, which can be found in all body tissues but especially in the nose, throat, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal tract.
The most common food allergies are shrimp, lobster, crab, and other shellfish, nuts of all kinds (peanuts, walnuts, and tree nuts), wheat, corn, dairy, fish, and eggs.

The official line is that only about 1.5 percent of adults and up to 6 percent of children younger than 3 years in the United States — about 4 million people — have a “true” food allergy, according to researchers. But the reality is most likely quite different. Setting aside for a moment the 150 or so people who die every year from food allergies in the US, you can make a case that virtually 100% of people have a low level allergic response to foods such as wheat, corn, and dairy. By low level, we’re talking about almost immeasurable systemic inflammation in the body and chronic mucous production — either seen in the stools, or experienced as constant throat clearing, sniffling, and high susceptibility to allergy triggers such as dust and pollen.

Other allergies

Ultimately, allergies are not restricted to proteins. Almost anything can trigger an allergic response in a susceptible individual — for example sunlight (solar urticaria) and water (aquagenic urticaria) can trigger responses in a small number of people. But dig deep enough, and a protein may still play a prominent role — as can be seen in solar urticaria.

However, our focus is on dietary proteins and protein allergies. With that in mind, the primary culprits are:

Dairy and whey
Eggs
Soy
Shell fish
And wheat gluten meat substitutes for vegetarians
But concerns about protein consumption do not end with food allergies and intolerances. There are a couple of other conditions that need to be mentioned:

Aminoacidemia
Intestinal toxemia
Whey Contributes To Aminoacidemia

Aminoacidemia may sound like a disease, but it’s not. It is a condition in which excessive amounts of amino acids are present in the blood. If there is nothing in the diet, for example, to account for it, it could be indicative of missing or defective enzymes in the liver, which are essential for the breakdown of nitrogen containing amino acids in the body. If your body can’t sufficiently break down amino acids, it can lead to generalized hyper-aminoacidemia, and ultimately to neurotoxicity and early death.

For years bodybuilders have claimed that excess amino acids dumped quickly into the bloodstream is a helpful condition for building muscle. Unfortunately, new studies now indicate that not only is this not necessarily true, but that aminoacidemia may be a contributing factor in the onset of diabetes. Specifically, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has confirmed that whey’s high Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score actually ensures a rate of amino acid delivery that is too rapid to sustain the anabolic requirement during the postprandial period (the period right after a meal).

Again, we’re talking about intentionally induced aminoacidemia through diet. For years bodybuilders have claimed this is a helpful condition for building muscle, and for several years now, this has been one of the main selling features of whey protein in the bodybuilding community. The rational is that muscle growth is about staying in a positive nitrogen state. Exercise damages muscle, stresses it, and throws your body into a negative nitrogen catabolic (breakdown) state. And the best way to take yourself out of a catabolic state and into a positive nitrogen anabolic (building) state is to consume the fastest absorbing protein you can get your hands on — whey. And there is no question that whey protein induces a short term dramatic increase in blood levels of amino acids — i.e. aminoacidemia. Unfortunately, new studies now indicate that this rational, taken as a whole, may not necessarily be true.

Specifically, studies have confirmed the “paradox” of the highly soluble proteins found in whey and whey isolate, which, despite their high Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score, ensure a rate of amino acid delivery that is too rapid to sustain the body’s anabolic requirement during the minutes and hours after consuming it — thus being counterproductive for the development of muscle. Or in simple terms, aminoacidemia may not provide the benefit many bodybuilders think it does.

But even worse, aminoacidemia may actually have long term health consequences. One example is diabetes. Interestingly enough, short term aminoacidemia can actually lower blood sugar levels since it stimulates higher beta-cell secretion and a concomitant increase in insulin levels (by as much as 40%). This, of course, significantly lowers blood sugar levels. However, over time, this constant stimulation may overstress and degrade the ability of beta-cells to produce sufficient insulin when called for and may ultimately, over time, contribute to pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions in the body.

In addition, excess amino acids are converted into carbon dioxide, water, and ammonia. Ammonia is toxic to the body and is a primary cause of premature fatigue. Normally, the body handles excess ammonia by converting it to urea then filtering it through the kidneys. But if the ammonia level is too high, it overburdens the kidneys. This is why doctors will insist on lower levels of protein intake in cases of kidney disease. And finally, although you can find studies all over the map on the question of high amino acid levels in the blood (i.e., high protein consumption) and bone loss, by far, the most convincing studies indicate that there is a problem.

For bodybuilders, the paradox of aminoacidemia says that the main virtue of whey, its high Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score, probably produces a rate of amino acid delivery that is too rapid to sustain the anabolic requirement during the immediate hours after consuming it – thus making it counterproductive for the development of muscle.

Whey and Intestinal Toxemia

Intestinal toxemia is not a medical condition. It is more of a catchall phrase used in the alternative health community to describe a set of conditions that can arise in the intestinal tract as the result of improper dietary choices. It has three primary manifestations:

Putrefaction, which is caused by bacterial action on undigested proteins. Guanidine, histamine, mercaptans, indol, phenyl, skato, and other organic toxins may be formed as a result.
Rancidity refers specifically to the spoilage of fats. This can actually occur in the digestive tract itself — not just from the consumption of rancid fats in the diet. The primary concern is that rancid fats promote the production of peroxide free radicals in the body.
Fermentation is caused by the action of bacteria and yeasts on carbohydrates. Excessive gas, increased blood alcohol levels (that’s why excess sugar can give you a hangover), and Candida hyper-growth are just three problems associated with intestinal fermentation.
Intestinal toxemia occurs when large particles of undigested food enter the small intestine and colon. Since these parts of the digestive tract were not designed to handle excessive amounts of undigested food, the partially digested food mass becomes a fertile breeding ground for bacteria and yeast fermentation. Each nutrient degrades in its own unique way. Proteins putrefy, carbohydrates ferment, and fats become rancid due to the workings of intestinal bacteria. These bacteria then produce harmful by-products that damage the intestines, reduce nutrient assimilation, create excess gas and bloating, and lead to persistent diarrhea. On top of that, mild to intense stomach pains (the result of muscle cramping and excessive gas) accompany this process. Prolonged intestinal toxemia may be a major contributing factor in the onset of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Crohn’s Disease.

For a number of reasons, whey protein can be a major factor in promoting intestinal toxemia. Whey contains no fiber, which is necessary to keep things moving consistently through the intestinal tract. Because it is highly processed, whey protein contains no live enzymes to break down the large whey proteins. The human body actually has a hard time breaking down the three primary proteins in whey. Taken together, these problems provide an optimum environment for non-beneficial intestinal bacteria to thrive in. In addition, whey is very acid forming, which lowers the pH of the normally alkaline environment of the intestinal tract, thus favoring the growth of unfriendly bacteria over beneficial bacteria.

 

To learn about Arbonne Essentials vegan protein shakes, check out my blog below:

https://lawandathefitnessdiva.wordpress.com/2012/06/14/nutritional-info-and-recipesfor-arbonne-essentials-vegan-protein-shakes/ 

To order, go to www.lawandathefitnessdiva.myarbonne.com

 

Arbonne Essentials Holiday Eggnog Protein Shake

November 16, 2012

Arbonne Essentials Holiday Eggnog Protein Shake
½ cup coconut milk
½ cup almond milk, unsweetened
 6-7 ice cubes( add more to make thicker)
1 tbsp. raw coconut oil
2 teaspoons of stevia ( add more if more sweetness is desired)
1 tsp. nutmeg
½ tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. vanilla
2 scoops Arbonne Essentials  vanilla protein powder

To order Arbonne Essentials protein powder in vanilla or chocolate, go to www.lawandathefitnessdiva.myarbonne.com

Sweet potato hash browns! Sweet potatoes and apples turn greasy old hash browns into a sweet and healthy explosion of antioxidants.

November 12, 2012
  • 2 tbsp olive or coconut oil
  • 1 large granny smith apple, peeled and sliced into thin matchsticks
  • 1/2 C thinly sliced onion
  • 3 medium sweet potatoes, cut into thin matchsticks (about 2 cups)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon

Loading…

Directions

1.
In a large skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil over medium-high heat. Add apple and onion and cook until soft (about 4 minutes). Set aside in a covered bowl. Add 1 tablespoon oil to skillet. Spread potatoes in pan in an even layer and press them down lightly with a spatula. Cook until golden brown on the bottom (about 5 minutes). Drizzle with remaining oil and flip potatoes. Cook for about 5 more minutes.
2.
Add apple and onion mixture to potatoes and heat through. Sprinkle with cinnamon and add salt and pepper to taste

 

Arbonne Essentials vegan protein shake recipes.

November 11, 2012

 

 
ALMOND CRUNCH
2 scoop of Arbonne protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1-2 tsp xylitol or a few drops of stevia
1 Tbsp slivered or sliced raw almond
CHOCOLATE
2 scoop of Arbonne chocolate protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
3/4 tsp flax oil
1 tsp xylitol
Pinch Cocoa nibs (unsweetened)
1 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder
NUTTY APPLE CINNAMON
2 scoop of Arbonne  protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1/4 cup unsweetened apple sauce or 1/2 sour green apple, sliced
Cinnamon to taste
1 Tbsp raw pecans, slivered or sliced raw almonds
SWEET VERRY BERRY
 
2 scoop of Arbonne  protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1/4 cup organic coconut milk + 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1 tbsp of almond butter
1/4 cup frozen or fresh berries
Some coconut shaves unsweetened
MOCHA SHAKE
2 scoop of Arbonne chocolate protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1 tbsp of almond butter
1 teaspoon instant coffee crystals
BLACKBERRY TANG
2 scoop of Arbonne protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1/4 cup organic coconut milk + 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1 tbsp of almond butter
1 pomegranate Arbonne energy fizz stick, dissolved in 1/2 cup water
1/4 to 1/2 cup of fresh/frozen unsweetened blackberries
LEMON/LIME FRESH
2 scoop of Arbonne protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1/4 cup organic coconut milk or unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1/2 cup of water and 1-2 tsp xylitol or drops of stevia
1/2 a lemon/lime (peeled and sliced). may add a few rind shavings for health and taste or use 1-2 Tbsp lemon/lime juice or to taste
BANANA/PEANUT BUTTER
2 scoop of Arbonne vanilla protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and water
1 tbsp of natural peanut butter
1/2 banana
PUMPKIN SPICE
2 scoop of Arbonne  protein powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber
3/4 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk or coconut milk, may add ice and or water
1/4 cup pumpkin puree (minimize if weight loss is a goal)
1 Tbsp pecans
Pumpkin pie spice to taste
 
Here are more recipes!
PRETTY IN PINK
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
Splash of pure cranberry juice
1 handful strawberries and raspberries (fresh or frozen)
6-8 ice cubes
Vanilla Almond milk or Rice Dream to desired slushy consistency
Adapted by Simply Fit Kitchen
BERRY POWER
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
½ cup blueberries
¼ cup strawberries
¼ cup blackberries
1 medium carrot
1 cup almond milk
½-1 cup pomegranate juice (cranberry is an okay substitute)
1-2 cups ice (add more if necessary)
Adapted by Simply Fit Kitchen
KIWI LIME SHAKE
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
Handful of sliced kiwis
Juice of 2 lime wedges (to intensify flavor, add lime zest)
6 -8 ice cubes
¼ cup coconut milk, Almond milk or Vanilla Rice Dream to desired consistency
Adapted by Simply Fit Kitchen
ALMOND JOY
2 scoops of Arbonne Chocolate Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup Almond milk
1 Tbsp Almond Butter
½ tsp coconut extract
6-8 ice cubes
Adapted by Simply Fit Kitchen
CINNA-BUN PROTEIN SHAKE
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 cup organic vanilla unsweetened almond milk
6-8 ice cubes
ALMOND CRUNCH
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup unsweetened almond milk or rice milk
1 Tbsp slivered or sliced raw almonds
6-8 ice cubes
VANILLA CHAI
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup of brewed decaf Chai tea
3 oz. almond milk + 6-8 ice cubes
“PISTACIO” DREAM
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/2 cup water + 1/2 cup coconut milk
1/2 avocado
6-8 ice cubes
CARROT CAKE
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup cooked, chopped carrots
1 Tbsp walnuts
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice or cinnamon
1 cup of water + 1 cup Almond milk
6-8 ice cubes
CHOCOLATE SPINACH CRUNCH
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
9 oz. water
1 ½ – 2 handfuls of fresh spinach
6-8 hazelnuts
6-8 ice cubes
DOUBLE CHOCOLATE FIX
2 scoops of Arbonne Chocolate Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk or rice milk
3/4 tsp flax oil
a pinch of unsweetened Cocoa nibs
1 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder
6-8 ice cubes
NUTTY APPLE CINNAMON
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup unsweetened almond milk or rice milk
1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce; or 1/2 sour green apple, sliced
ground cinnamon, to taste
1 Tbsp raw pecans; or slivered/sliced raw almonds
6-8 ice cubes
SWEET VERRY BERRY
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/4 cup organic coconut milk + 1/2 cup unsweetened almond or rice milk
8 oz water
1 Tbsp of almond butter
1/4 cup frozen or fresh berries
(optional: a pinch or two of unsweetened coconut shavings)
6-8 ice cubes
MOCHA SHAKE
2 scoops of Arbonne Chocolate Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk or rice milk
1 Tbsp of almond butter
1 tsp instant decaf coffee crystals
6-8 ice cubes
  
BLACKBERRY TANG
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/4 cup organic coconut milk + 1/2 cup unsweetened almond or rice milk
1 Tbsp of almond butter
1 pomegranate Arbonne fizzy tab, dissolved in 1/2 cup water
1/4 to 1/2 cup of fresh/frozen unsweetened blackberries
6-8 ice cubes
LEMON LIME FRESH
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/4 cup organic coconut milk or unsweetened almond or rice milk
1/2 cup of water
1-2 tsp of stevia
1/2 a lemon/lime, peeled and sliced (*May add a few rind shavings for zing or use 1-2 Tbsp fresh lemon/lime juice)
6-8 ice cubes
BANANA/PEANUT BUTTER
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/2 cup unsweetened almond or rice milk
1 Tbsp of natural peanut butter
1/2 medium banana
6-8 ice cubes
PUMPKIN SPICE
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
3/4 cup unsweetened chocolate almond or rice milk
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 Tbsp pecans
Pumpkin pie spice, to taste
6-8 ice cubes
BAY COOLER
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
4 oz. water
6 cherries
1/4 c. fresh pineapple chunks + 6-8 ice cubes
CHOCOLATE BERRY DELIGHT
2 scoops of Arbonne Chocolate Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/2 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup frozen mixed berries + 6-8 ice cubes
ITALIAN MELON
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 small orange + 1 cup cubed cantaloupe
3 basil leaves
8 oz water + 6-8 ice cubes
ISLAND LIME
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/2 pealed lime and 1/2 banana
1 bunch spinach
8 oz water + 6-8 ice cubes
PINA COLADA
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1/2 cup coconut milk
1/3 cup fresh pineapple chunks
1 tsp. coconut extract
4 oz water + 6-8 ice cubes
ORANGE CREAMSICLE
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
4 oz. fresh orange juice
4 oz water + 6-8 ice cubes
FUZZY PEACH
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
2 oz. coconut milk + 4 oz. water
1/2 c. frozen peaches
6-8 ice cubes
TRIPLE TROPIC
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
½ peeled kiwi, ½ peeled mango, ½ cup fresh pineapple chunks
4 oz. water + 6-8 ice cubes
PAPAYA LIME
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
½ lime, ½ cup papaya chunks, ½ golden passion fruit
8 oz. water + 6-8 ice cubes
BLACK FOREST
2 scoops of Arbonne Chocolate Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
1 cup unsweetened chocolate almond milk or rice milk
Pinch unsweetened cocoa nibs
1 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1/3 cup dark cherries (NOT maraschino!)
8 oz. water + 6-8 ice cubes
VEGGIE MAX
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
Lightly steamed veggies: 1/2 carrot, 2 broccoli florets, 1 handful fresh spinach
½ apple, slice + ½ small orange, peeled
8 oz. water + 6-8 ice cubes
CHUNKY MONKEY
2 scoops of Arbonne Chocolate Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
½ medium banana
1 Tbsp almond butter
1 tsp ground flax seed
8 oz. water + 6-8 ice cubes
ORANGE PEAR
2 scoops of Arbonne Vanilla Protein Powder + 1 scoop of Arbonne Fiber Boost
½ cooked sweet potato
½ pear
a pinch of orange zest
8 oz. water + 6-8 ice cubes
 
 
 
Use a blender with some ice for your Arbonne protein shakes. I generally make a 16 ounces shake as a meal replacement or a recovery shake
 
after a hard workout.
 
To order Arbonne Essentials protein shakes: go to www.lawandathefitnessdiva.myarbonne.com  OR email me @ aerobicsdelivered@gmail.com
 
For more info about my weight loss journey with Arbonne Essentials, click below:
https://lawandathefitnessdiva.wordpress.com/2011/09/30/my-weight-loss-progression-and-the-supplements-that-helped-to-get-me-there/